US Presidential Race – A Learning Board

A yearlong battle with approximately US $3 billion spent on it and the verdict is the  same. President Obama got re-elected; Republicans have majority in the house and Democrats in the senate. On the face, nothing changed. Even to maintain status quo, it is a case of survival of the fittest. So here are some lessons risk managers can learn from the US Presidential race.

1.      Don’t rest on your laurels

President Obama was leading the race, and then he was complacent in the first debate. Romney gained advantage and in the last few weeks, the race was neck-to-neck. Once we achieve something, we tend to take it for granted. Over time from peak status, we gradually unnoticeably start slipping until the gap is huge. Then we are shocked on discovering we are not as good as we thought. As risk managers, we need to continuously manage risks and upgrade skills. We cannot take it for granted that risks will remain the same and everyone will see things in the same light.

2.      Use disasters to demonstrate skills

President Obama in 2008 used the financial crises to demonstrate his leadership skills. In this election, he exhibited presidential capabilities during hurricane Sandy. The message was clear to the public, in crises he leads with calmness and control. He is on top of the things. Risk managers must lead from the front to build trust and confidence in the business teams. They must not start the blame game when risk disasters occur.

3.      Cover the whole organization

President Obama won the elections due to his people centric approach. He was the favorite among women, minority communities and middle class. The Republican party upper echelons are white dominated and Romney sounded pro-rich. He failed to address specific issues of the masses except the jobs shortfall. Risk managers to build a risk culture and make risk management successful, you must spread the word at all levels of the organization. Communicating just with the top management is insufficient and ineffective.

4.      Negative messages work

This election saw the highest number of negative messages from both parties. Democrats and Republicans ran down their competitors. Pointing out problems with others strategies benefitted their game. Risk managers need to incorporate negative messages in their communication strategy. Sometimes giving strong messages of what can go wrong helps in changing minds. Secondly, communication has to be continuous, not periodical. To build the right culture, communicate daily.

5.      Define starting point clearly

Most of the problems President Obama faced during first term were from President George Bush’s era. He took over an economy and country in distress. However, he made that clear to the public and did not take the blame for Bush’s bad decisions. In risk management too, on taking a new role clearly highlight the current status and previous problems. Define the starting point first before laying down the road map for progress. Don’t take blame or responsibility for predecessors problems.

Closing thoughts

President Obama’s first task is to address the fiscal deficit and that will lay the foundation of his second term. In his book – Audacity of Hope – he had inspired many to think beyond the present limitations and lead change. This term will define whether he will be remembered successfully as a President. With his personal achievements, he has shown the world that most barriers can be broken. Risk managers can take that lesson from his life and work towards changing the organizations risk climate.

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